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A REVIEW OF GAME CHANGERS


The power of location, or knowing “where,” has been discussed and marketed from the perspective of competitive advantage. There is no doubt that being able to correlate location data with other data and to enhance business intelligence is a competitive advantage, but how is it transforming not only the way we do business, but businesses themselves?


1. Transparency


Excerpt from The Effect of Transparency on Business
http://imagingnotes.com/go/article_free.php?mp_id=180


What if a mashup of publicly available market data, economic data, transportation routes and imagery provides more insight on the health of a company than the diligently managed 10Ks, 10Qs, 8Ks and financial analyst reports produced by armies of accountants, lawyers, and nancial analysts? The financial scandals of the early 2000s, such as Enron, WorldCom and HealthSouth, and today’s financial crisis demonstrate that those carefully produced reports designed to ensure transparency (at least by the Securities Act of 1934) and an efficient financial market could not be trusted. Will new corporate positions emerge, such as the now famililar “Twitter correspondent” and “blogmaster,” for companies to respond to unmanaged transparency?

Traditional maps have been storytellers of moments in history. Today’s interactive maps are no longer mere snapshots, and tomorrow’s maps, which will encompass real-time data feeds from an extensive SensorWeb, will be real-time audits of corporate, government and human activity. Can marketing and communications budgets compete with this real-time storytelling?

What should be the corporate response to material generated by “Radical Cartography” and its ilk? Two of the unplanned offshoots of ubiquitous satellite imagery and web availability are decentralized activism and open source intelligence, supported by imagery. Anyone can now be their own journalist, private investigator, intelligence analyst, and media platform. With imagery freely available and accessible, and when bundled with multi-platform media, companies have a real issue to address. Despite the securities regulations, the financial markets have never been transparent. In fact, profit often times results from “mystery.” What happens in a transparent world?

“The Age of Transparency” is still unfolding, but clearly imagery and GIS have been enlisted as tools to present points of view faster, better, and cheaper than ever before. Don’t be surprised at the mashup as an increasingly powerful corporate and government monitoring tool. We anticipate a variety of corporate responses to yet another digital media onslaught (for example peer-to-peer le sharing, blogs, YouTube). This transparency offers an opportunity for companies to leverage this new age of transparency, and to respond more maturely than the music industry did to Napster. (For those of you who may not recall, Napster was the peer-to-peer le sharing program that led to illegal transferring of music files. The music industry’s response was to sue mostly teenagers and students. After close to five years of this litigious strategy, the music industry decided in December 2008 to stop such lawsuits.)


2. Privacy


Excerpt from Location Data Privacy: The Elephant in the Room
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/location-data-privacy/260329


And from Big Data and the NSA
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/big-data-and-nsa/260439


The scale and pace at which location information collection, aggregation, and sharing is unfolding is all happening without any clear boundaries around the use of the data. Complicating matters is the fact that most people don’t understand the value of location information the way they understand the value of personal financial or medical information. This skews the debate towards whether location information should be collected or shared in the first place rather than discussing how and when it’s appropriate, and the corresponding privacy issues.

While location information has been collected for years, it has generally been collected for specific purposes and by organizations that were not selling location-based products and services. In other words, the location data or personal data itself was not the revenue generator. Today with the advent of “freemium” services, whole businesses and industries exist for the sole purpose of selling personal data, and that includes location data.

First, it is important to note that every digital service, mobile application or device is a data collection opportunity, especially if the service is free (which isn’t really free; you pay for it with your personal information). Second, location information is always present because everything and everyone is somewhere. Location data is derived from multiple sources—address data, customer data, mobile data, semantic data, geo-tagged photos, IP addresses, smart machines and services and more. Third, in order to deliver most digital services—especially voice, video and data—network operators and platform providers require the ability to “know” and “see” certain information such as location and the type of data that moves across the network.

Individuals, businesses, and government agencies have come to rely on these technologies for convenience, productivity, and emergency response. The ability to place a geo-fence around people, and the ability to see the movements of persons of interest is not necessarily a bad thing. It is very important when it comes to emergency response, threat detection and other vital issues. What is important is for people to understand the sensitivity of location data, or for that matter any information they transmit through digital services.

This awareness begins with understanding how the information is collected, used and shared, and how it connects other, seemingly unrelated information to create a rich portrait of their lives. This is easier said than done, however because many companies and services go to great lengths to mask the answers to these questions.

An entire data economy has evolved that preys on personal data. There are companies that have built their business models around keeping individuals in the dark about how their data is being collected, used, and shared. There are also companies that have built their business models around protecting privacy.
In order for individuals to play a role in protecting their data, transparency needs to become the normal way of operating. People should be able to know the facts so they can make informed decisions.
See Figure 2.


aodimage2
FIGURE 2. Location Data Connections

Companies should take the lead in being responsible stewards of the data they collect, use and share. The mindset has to shift from “getting away” with as much as possible in order to monetize people’s data to one of using privacy protections as a competitive advantage. Companies should also align themselves with other companies that have a similar view on location data privacy protections. Peer pressure and public indignation can be powerful tools.

→ Do you know what’s going on with your location data?
→ Do you steward location data responsibly?
→ Do you know your location data privacy risk score?
→ Are you transparent in your location data management practices?


3. Humans as Data Source


Excerpt from Humans as Sensors
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/humans-sensors/260057


FIGURE 3. Publisher Myrna James Yoo showing wearable computing, Google Glass.
FIGURE 3. Publisher Myrna James Yoo showing wearable computing, Google Glass.

The real world, and people in it, are becoming mapped and tracked. With millions of mobile sensors on the move (soon to be 50 billion connected devices), anyone will be able to collect needed data that was never available before. If a business depends on or could benefit from these types of data, it is now going to be possible to acquire it. See Figure 3.

 

 

 

 


When female thinking is integrated into product development, or when products are speci cally designed for a female audience, we have found that the end product produced is actually relevant to a wider audience. Women have basic requirements when it comes to products—they want it to work properly and to work well; they don’t want to experiment with it, and they want it to be beautiful. In developing products, we need to think about the diversity of the audience. If we include more women in that process, we are more likely to produce more relevant and diversified products, which is good for everyone.


4. Women in Location


Excerpt from Women in Location 2013
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/women-location/260421


Location-based thinking and technologies are not just about the ROI, new products, revenue goals, cost cutting, and targeting consumers to buy more stuff, which have been the focus of a great deal of our reporting these last four years; it’s about the human connection we all have to place, and what that means to us as individuals: how we see the world, and how we behave in the world—for better or worse.

Women are not only 50% of the population, but they generally think differently then men. Women are currently under-represented in the location industry, not much differently than in technology, science and engineering, but that is changing every day. Women put faces, personalities, and visions to such areas of location as 3D big data management, environmental and atmospheric modeling, location-based services and mobility, mobile marketing and targeted advertising, Smart Cities, geo-accounting and geo-business intelligence, and to such industries as retail, nonprofit, consulting, and communications.

Women seem to take location technologies to a higher, inspiring level. So what can women do for location?
When female thinking is integrated into product development, or when products are speci cally designed for a female audience, we have found that the end product produced is actually relevant to a wider audience. Women have basic requirements when it comes to products—they want it to work properly and to work well; they don’t want to experiment with it, and they want it to be beautiful. In developing products, we need to think about the diversity of the audience. If we include more women in that process, we are more likely to produce more relevant and diversified products, which is good for everyone.

wilimage


5. The New Metric: Next-gen KPIs


Excerpt from Next-Gen KPIs: Integrating Dynamic Data
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/next-gen-kpis/260059


The majority of today’s KPIs are constructed from opera- tional data like sales, inventory, churn, network performance, etc. Some corporate KPIs broaden the lens by integrating customer demographic ( rmographic) and psychographic information. But with increasing frequency, organizations are looking to integrate environmental data like economic trends, weather, and health statistics into their KPIs.

The result is that the further one moves outside the walls of the enterprise, the more robust the data becomes and the more predictable the results. See Figure 4 for a data enrichment view of operational KPIs. Interestingly, most corporate strategy groups integrate market research data into their plans. This is logical, as market research includes customer and environmental information, but the data seldom make their way into corporate KPIs.

The location (“where”) data is the common denominator. Everything revolves around an asset’s location, a cusomer’s location, a producer’s location. With location as the baseline of a KPI, any piece of information tied to that location can be associated with it and create a new picture of the information. When information is tied to location, what previously seemed irrelevant suddenly becomes rel- evant— time, weather, behavior of customers.

FIGURE 4. The data outside the walls of internal corporate data can often provide a more robust and comprehensive view of overall business performance.
FIGURE 4. The data outside the walls of internal corporate data can often provide a more robust and comprehensive view of overall business performance.

6. The Location Intelligence Officer


Excerpt from Where is the Location Intelligence Officer?
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/“where”-location-intelligence-officer/260226


Executive level of cers within an organization—CEO, CFO, CMO, CTO, CIO, COO—all bring specific skills to operate a business. These skills include at a minimum organizational management, budgeting and finance, technology, sales and marketing, and industry knowledge, as well as the ability to leverage operational, customer, and marketing data. Most successful executives are good at knowing how to extract, analyze and act upon that data; after all, these executives learned it either in business school or on the job.

But the new data kid on the block is location data, which presents some interesting opportunities and challenges for executives unfamiliar with it. Location information is generally not part of any business’s strategic plan, and is also generally not a core competency of an organization. Therefore, as location information becomes more readily available, and as organizations embark on incorporating location applications, who within the organization and within the C-suite is responsible for ensuring that location is being used to meet the company’s strategic goals?

Most white collar workers and newly minted MBAs come in at a managerial level in a business and they get, at best, a high-level or very specific departmental view of the business; to be successful at becoming a more effective manager of the business, they need to understand where things are, how they are connected, how all the systems function and how the team works together in order to get the “ship” to go in the right direction.

As location information and location-based technologies become more pervasive, businesses that are impacted by location are forced to rethink how they will accomplish their mission, along with what kind of supporting infrastructure will be required to support the mission. Businesses that need to market or operate across vast geographic footprints are inherently location-dependent. If a company has a need to incorporate location information to achieve its goals, then it needs that expertise at the top of the organization to spread that experience across the organization and enable the integration of location information across the company.

Integrating location information and location-based technologies is not just about the data and the technology. We are not talking about a market research project or a technology project. Integration of location intelligence into an organization is not just operational, or about implementing the “right” system or applications; it’s a mindset and a game changer impacting the culture of the business. Integrating location intelligence is about leadership and organizational culture. This requires a Location Intelligence “Officer” (LIO).

The LIO must bring a skillset similar to those of the other CxOs, along with location information
experience, including how location information is developed, managed, provided, maintained, used (how it shouldn’t be used), and integrated into the business process.


7. Location Analytics


Excerpt from On Demand Market Scenarios
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/demand-market- scenarios/260150


And from Location Metrics: Measuring Human
Activity in the Physical World
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/location-metrics/260457


BMAP is the tracking of actual physical assets that move around the globe, from power plants to pipelines to refineries, and of vessels that can be tracked for anticipated deliveries. BMAP enables the tracking of global storms worldwide and provides damage/impact forecasts from these storms on the oil, gas and power infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico. Visualize the relationships, patterns and impacts that drive the markets. This is a first!

BMAP is available on every Bloomberg terminal (there are about 250,000-300,000 terminals). The sales team has found BMAP to be a critical competitive advantage in the marketplace, allowing them entrance to forms that weren’t previously open to Bloomberg; it has shortened the sales cycle, and enhanced the Bloomberg brand.

Location and place are part of everyone’s daily lives, but they have never been systematically measured in real-time—until now. Placed is a location analytics company that focuses on understanding the importance of location by directly measuring the location of mobile devices of individuals.

If a company is interested in targeting television ads to females, it will likely turn to Nielsen, which has recruited a panel to measure television habits for the U.S. If a company is interested in reaching that same audience on the Web, they would turn to click stream data sourced from a panel recruited by ComScore. But if a company is interested in real-time information about customer behavior in a changing physical world, that has not been possible until Placed. What is important about measuring real world human behavior in near real-time is that it establishes a baseline to measure change. For example, why is a retailer seeing a drop in foot traffic? Placed can readily answer the question by quantifying where else their customers go, how that compares to previous months, and what the competition looks like.

Mobile data, measured through smartphones, provides an additional layer of data that is directly measured, while avoiding the pitfalls often associated with surveys and self-reported measurement. This is an opportunity to shift from a world of anecdotal measurement, which is traditionally reliant upon human recall, surveys, and journals, to a directly measured world where these biases are removed, so that for the first time, we can truly understand and quantify what is going on in our world. This information is critical for businesses to adapt to a dynamic world where big data is now the norm versus the exception. The Information Economy is nothing like the Industrial Economy, yet to date, businesses have been relying on old ways of understanding and modeling customer and therefore market dynamics.


Companies should take the lead in being responsible stewards of the data they collect, use and share. The mindset has to shift from “getting away” with as much as possible in order to monetize people’s data to one of using privacy protections as a competitive advantage.


8. Locationomics


Excerpt from Locationomics: Quantifying the Value of Location Data, Applicatinos, and Technologies
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/locationomics/260449


Location data is any data with an implicit or explicit geographic or geospatial reference. This includes any data derived from GPS and mobile devices, geo-tagged or geo-referenced images, video, audio, and text documents, satellite and aerial imagery, maps and GIS systems, IP address location, location-based applications, and address information from public documents, surveys, or product registrations.

With this de nition of location data, the vast majority of data an organization touches are location-based or have a location component, which means that every business process is location-based. Not everyone realizes that yet. Welcome to the world of Locationomics.

Locationomics is the use of location data about people, places, assets and situations by businesses and organizations to enable them to save time and money, operate more ef ciently, better serve existing and future customers, and identify new product and service opportunities. Location data weaves through an organization, connecting and linking information from across the enterprise, thereby creating a multiplier effect of value.

locationomics


9. Scale


Excerpt from Scaling Map Wizardry: To 100 Million Microsoft Office 2013 Users
http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/scaling-map-wizardry/260432


Marketing, operations, and business managers have been asking their IT departments for several years now for ways to see data on a map. IT and GIS (or IT and geo-applications) have not mixed well as departments or as integrated priorities. This difficulty has left many managers and departments to seek other solutions or to engage in “skunk works” (top secret) projects with a variety of available technologies, including free and open source applications. These work-arounds to productivity have had both their successes and challenges.

Microsoft has come to the rescue to those who have been waiting for an easy and seamless way to map business data. With over 100 million enterprise users of Of ce 2013, Microsoft’s GeoFlow (now Power Map) will forever change the Excel spreadsheet experience. For those who have not yet explored the location dimension of business or data, you are in for a mind-changing, and mind-expanding experience. Welcome to the world of location intelligence!

Power Map is a wizard on the Microsoft Of ce Excel 2013 toolbar that allows you to visualize and explore your spreadsheet data in ways that reveal new insights, tell stories, and even animate historical information. You can create 3D columns, bubbles and heat maps to create a tour of data, or what Ari Schorr, Product Marketing Manager on the Of ce Technical Product Marketing team, likes to call “cinematic packages of insights.”

Esri launched Esri Maps for Of ce in 2012. Esri Maps for Office is focused on integration with ArcGIS, and the plug-in is only available to ArcGIS users. It offers much more geospatial functionality and is tied to a sophisticated GIS system. Power Map, on the other hand, was designed with limited geospatial functionality for any information user whose primary business analysis tool is Excel spreadsheets.
Attention Business Schools and MBA programs! Are you keeping up?

“Location and place are part of everyone’s daily lives, but they have never been systematically measured in real-time—until now.”


10. Distributed Everything: Geospatial Standards


Excerpt from GeoEconomy Standards: The Value of Symplifying the Exchange of Geospatial Information http://www.lbxjournal.com/articles/geoeconomy-standards/260273


In The Global Shift, Peter Dicken wrote “The geo-economy… can be pictured as a geographically uneven, highly complex and dynamic web of production networks, economic spaces and places connected together through threads of ows. Once established, a cluster tends to grow through a process of cumulative, self-reinforcing development involving:

→ Attraction of linked activities
→ Stimulation of entrepreneurship and innovation
→ Deepening and widening of the local labor market
→ Economic diversification
→ Enrichment of the ‘industrial atmosphere’
→ ‘Thickening’ of local institutions
→ Intensification of the socio-cultural milieu
→ Enhanced physical infrastructures.”

We invite you to consider that the global GeoEconomy, as well as many valuable non-economic activities, depend on the exchange of geoinformation and that the cost-efficient exchange of geoinformation depends on standards, particularly open standards.

Without geospatial standards of some kind, there could be no communication of geospatial information. Like paved cow paths, or natural languages, many standards are formalizations of common usage. Empires are important drivers for such formalizations. For example, the Prime Meridian passes through the Observatory at Greenwich largely because England had dominated the seas for almost two centuries before the U.S. called for an International Meridian Conference to establish a single global standard. In the digital age, innovation speeds along, constantly creating new and pathless territory for standardization. Companies vie for dominance, hoping to establish their proprietary encodings and interfaces as platforms for further development that they can control and exploit.

With nothing but proprietary standards, geospatial information would certainly flow to support the global GeoEconomy and non-economic activities, and there would be a market in geoinformation. There would still be technology convergence, information fusion and growth of markets for geospatial data, services and products.

With open standards, however, there is more competition and more innovation. Users can influence
technologies’ directions through standards and they can shop in a more bounteous market. Entrepreneurs have more reason to hope, and both new and established businesses have more potential customers. We would still have a GeoEconomy without open standards, but it would be more constrained by monopolies.